Basic IVA Glass EC43R

EC43R BIVA Glass codes

I needed some Basic IVA glass for my Hot Rod.

This Hot Rod will need BIVA testing to get a registration and VIN number. Therefore it needs EC43R marked glass.

Basic IVA Glass (BIVA) – Flat

I’m not using flat glass, but many people use a replacement screen for a Land Rover Defender 90/110. You can buy these very cheaply (Paddock / LR Series / Britcar– under £50) and they come in various specs and shades of tint.

Some second-hand Defender screens will not have markings and given the cheap price, it makes sense to buy new. My local glass cutter mentioned he could cut a windscreen provided it was in “excellent” condition. Every second hand screen I looked at was very battered.

Land Rover 110 WindscreenLand Rover Defender EC43RLaminated Land Rover Discovery windscreen, made June 2016 in Germany to 43R & AS1 standards.

Part Numbers

  • MTC2863
  • CMB500710
  • LR042760

Dimensions: 45cm x 142cm

When you get them cut to size, ensure that you keep all of the markings visible.

Basic IVA Glass – Curved Windscreen

There aren’t many modern cars that have a windscreen narrow enough for my application so I went for an MG Midget. Other choices included the Morris Minor and Mini. For wider cars some people are using the Ford Zephyr items.
Original factory fitted windscreens probably wouldn’t have markings (pre 1976), but replacement items should. They come in all specifications; even heated. Luckily I won’t need this screen cutting, so the heated screen may help with the IVA defrosting requirements. On a Midget / Sprite, the marking is in the centre.

Some cars that were popular exports to America, often had AS1 markings from the mid 50’s onwards. Talk to your IVA testing centre to see if they are acceptable, as an allowance may be made.

MG Midget Windscreen
This is a German made MG Midget Laminated Windscreen from Moss, that meets the 43R requirement. Note that this glass is also AS1 marked, making it suitable for export to the US.

E1 = Germany
II = Laminated
AS1 = US FMVSS 205 compliant

Ricky Evans Motorsport also do a selection of heated screens for older / kit cars that may be worth investigation. These include Ford Zephyr, GT40 and Westfield.

Basic IVA Glass Regulations

Basic IVA (BIVA) regulations state that all glass is required to have 43R permanently marked on the glass in a visible area. It shouldn’t be obscured by the window rubber and If you are have the screen cut, must still be visible out of the drivers direct line of sight (edge of screen). If your side windows wind down, make sure they’re visible with the windows fully up (no need to disassemble the door and use a torch) .

If the marking is etched or engraved on, then a receipt from the manufacturer (not the supplier or glass cutter) is required. Normally markings are heat sunk enamel, done as part of the manufacturing process. 

Revision 8 of the Individual Vehicle Approval Manual – Passenger Vehicles states the following:

Section 45 Safety Glass

Method of Inspection Required Standard
Check that all windscreens, windows, and side screens are securely attached to the vehicle and are constructed from approved materials.
Clear panels, not made of glass, fitted to the vehicle that do not impinge on the forward, rearward or sideward view of the driver are considered to be body panels and are not subject to the requirements of this section.
Armoured vehicles do not have to display approval markings.
Note 1: For definition of windscreen see section 32
Note 2: “Safety Glazing” made from glass must be so constructed or treated that if fractured it does not fly into fragments likely to cause severe cuts. Each piece of glass must display the following relevant permanent marking applied by the glass manufacturer.
Note 3: “Safety Glazing” made from plastic means material which is so constructed or treated that if fractured it does not fly into fragments likely to cause severe cuts. “Safety glazing” made from plastic must have an “e” mark applied by the material manufacturer.
Note 4: The rear glazing in the folding roof of a convertible vehicle may be made of a flexible plastic pane.
Note 5: A greater opacity is permitted in the area of the windscreen below the “windscreen horizontal plane” and the area considered to be above the normal field of view.
Note 6: The fitting of window ‘glass’ is not mandatory but where fitted it must be assessed according to the required standards and if it is obvious the window has been deliberately removed for the purpose of the test then the window can be considered missing.
To confirm that the window has been deliberately removed an examiner should ensure that there are no window mechanisms, runners etc. or other window fixings that would indicate that a window should be fitted. If it is clear that, without modification, a window can be fitted then the window is to be considered missing.
1. Windscreens, windows and side-screens where fitted must be securely attached to the vehicle.
2. Windscreens, windows, internal glazed panels and side-screens where fitted must be suitable for its use. (see Note 1 and Table 1)
3. Windscreens must be “Safety Glazing” made from glass and display the relevant markings. (see Note 2 and Table 1)
4. All other windows (including sunroofs and removable glass panels) and side-screens must be “Safety Glazing” (which may be made from glass, or from plastic) and display the relevant markings. (see Notes 2, 3, 4 and Table 1)
5. Windscreens and windows wholly or partly on either side of the driver’s seat must allow a visual transmission of at least 70%, or 60% in the case of an armoured vehicle. (see Note 5)
6. Driver’s forward vision must not be distorted by the glazing material
7. Window(s) missing (see Note 6)

 

Table 1

Type of window Relevant Markings (Mandatory) In addition to “E” approval Supplementary Markings Markings Not Allowed
Windscreen I – for toughened glass
II – for ordinary laminated glass
III – for treated laminated glass
IV – for glass-plastics glazing
  V – safety glazing having a regular light transmittance less than 70 per cent.
VI – double-glazed unit
VII – uniformly-toughened glass which can only be used as windscreens for slow moving vehicles which, by construction, cannot exceed 40 km/h.
VIII – In the case of rigid plastic glazing.
Windows wholly or partly on either side of the driver’s seat VII – uniformly-toughened glass which can only be used as windscreens for slow moving vehicles which, by construction,cannot exceed 40 km/h.
VIII – In the case of rigid plastic glazing. In addition the appropriate application will be signified by: /B or /C
Where plastic glazing has been submitted for abrasion resistance tests the following markings will also be applied: /L or /M
VIII /B for side, rear and roof glazing
VIII /C in locations where there is little or no chance of head impact.
/L will be added to one of the above where the glazing is requisite for the driver’s forward field of vision.
V – in the case of safety glazing having a regular light transmittance less than 70 per cent.
Other windows and other glazed panels including internal glazed partitions. VII – uniformly-toughened glass which can only be used as windscreens for slow moving vehicles which, by construction, cannot exceed 40 km/h.
VIII – In the case of rigid plastic glazing. In addition the appropriate application will be signified by: /A, /B or /C
Where plastic glazing has been submitted for abrasion resistance tests the following markings will also be applied: /L or /M
VIII /A for forward facing panes
VIII /B for side, rear and roof glazing
VIII /C in locations where there is little or no chance of head impact.
/L will be added to one of the above where the glazing is requisite for the driver’s forward field of vision.
/M will be added to one of the above where the glazing is requisite for the driver’s rearward field of vision.
 

What do the glass markings mean?

The European markings have Three crucial parts:

  • The circled E and country number
  • The type of glass
  • The regulation and approval number

EC43R BIVA Glass Marking

  1. A trademark of the manufacturer.
  2. Glass type: Laminated ― a multilayered glass, Tempered ― a tempered glass.
  3. The expanded type of glass: (see Type of Glass table)
  4. Countries have given an official confirmation of a code (see Country Code table)
  5. Conformity with the American standards of safety M, AS, DOT.
  6. Conformity with the European standard of safety ECE R43.
  7. Number, month and year of manufacturing:
    Top left image:
    E1 = Germany
    3… =
    year (3 => 2003),
    month (… => 3 dots + 6 = 9 or September) – sum of points after year + 6
    Top Right Image: E17 = Finland
    …2 =
    year (2 => 2002),
    month (… => 3 dots = 3 or March) – number of dots before year
    Bottom Left Image:
    E2 = France
    9. =
    year (9 => 2009),
    month (. => 1 dots + 6 = 7 or July) – number of dots after year + 6
    Bottom left image:

    E1 = Germany
    year (9 => 2009),
    the sum of figures on the centre = month (1+2+8 = 11 => November),
    decimal number + the sum of remained figures below = the number of month (10+1+2+4 = 17th ).
  8. Conformity with the Chinese standard of safety CCC E000199/E000039.

Type Of Glass

If the “type of glass” symbol is missing, then it is known as a tempered part, with 70-percent light transmittance or above.

Common “type of glass” symbols are:

Symbol Glass Type US Equivalent
I Toughened windscreen (I/P if faced) Tempered N/A
I /P Toughened-glass windscreen with Plastic Facing Tempered Anti-lacerative -NA
II Ordinary laminated windscreen (II/P if faced) Laminated glass
II /P Laminated windscreen with Plastic Facing Laminated Anti-lacerative
III Treated laminated windscreen (III/P if faced) Heat-strengthened Laminated
IV Glass-Plastics glass Laminated Anti-lacerative
V Safety glazing (other than windscreen) having a regular light transmittance less than 70% Privacy
VI Double-glazed with less than 70% light transmittance Insulated Unit Privacy
VII Uniformly-toughened glass panes (tempered) which can be used as windscreens for slow-moving vehicles which, by construction, cannot exceed 40 km/h (24.8mph) Insulated Unit Privacy
VIII Rigid plastic glazing. In addition the appropriate application will be signified by:
/A – for forward facing panels
/B – for side, rear and roof glazing
/C – in locations where there is little or no chance of head impact. In addition, for plastic glazing which has been submitted to the abrasion resistance tests, the following markings shall also be applied as appropriate:
/L – for panes with a light scatter not exceeding 2% after 1000 cycles on the outer surface and 4% after 100 cycles on the inner surface
/M – for panes with a light scatter not exceeding 10 per cent after 500 cycles on the outer surface and 4 per cent after 100 cycles on the inner surface
Tempered parts for unlicensed vehicles

more info here

Country Codes

The code in the circle represents the country.

Code Country Code Country Code Country
E1 Germany E19 Romania E40 Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
E2 France E20 Poland E42 European Community
E3 Italy E21 Portugal E43 Japan
E4 Netherlands E22 Russia E45 Australia
E5 Sweden E23 Greece E46 Ukraine
E6 Belgium E24 Ireland E47 South Africa
E7 Hungary E25 Croatia E48 New Zealand
E8 Czech Republic E26 Slovenia E49 Cyprus
E9 Spain E27 Slovakia E50 Malta
E10 Serbia [and Montenegro] E28 Belarus E51 Republic of Korea
E11 United Kingdom E29 Estonia E52 Malaysia
E12 Austria E31 Bosnia and Herzegovina E53 Thailand
E13 Luxembourg E32 Latvia    
E14 Switzerland E34 Bulgaria    
E16 Norway E36 Lithuania    
E17 Finland E37 Turkey    
E18 Denmark E39 Azerbaijan    

Update: AS (American Standard) glass conforming to FMVSS 205 standards is also allowed (confirm with your testing centre). America has been marking glass for nearly 70 years so the the choice of glass is potentially greatly increased. Windscreens must be marked AS1. Some cars that were exported to the US, like Morris Minors, Large Fords may well be marked AS1.

Side Glass

I needed to find a modern car, with a long door, I could use as a Basic IVA glass donor. I went for a 2008 – 2017 Ford Fiesta 3 door as it was nearly 40″ long at the base.


It is Temperlite, which is a type of tempered glass. It was manufactured July 2000 in Belgium (E6).

According to The regulations:
All other windows (including sunroofs and removable glass panels) and side-screens must be “Safety Glazing” (which may be made from glass, or from plastic) and display the relevant markings. (see Notes 2, 3, 4 and Table 1)

Note 2: “Safety Glazing” made from glass must be so constructed or treated that if fractured it does not fly into fragments likely to cause severe cuts. Each piece of glass must display the following relevant permanent marking applied by the glass manufacturer.

Table 1: VII – uniformly-toughened glass which can only be used as windscreens for slow moving vehicles which, by construction,cannot exceed 40 km/h.

Reading between the lines

My problem is the VII marking was missing. I also checked numerous cars between 3 months and 20 years old and none of them had this mark either.

According to it’s manufacturer Ashashi Glass Company:
“Temperlite, improves the safety of automobiles through its unique fracture mechanism: When tempered glass breaks, it instantly shatters into pea-sized fragments, which are too small to cause serious injury.
Tempered glass is created by heating ordinary flat glass to cover 650° centigrade and then “quenching” it with a highly controlled blast of cool air. This rapid cooling creates compressive stress in the glass surface. The process makes tempered glass three to five times stronger than regular flat glass.”

The Glass type is missing, meaning this is Tempered glass with 70% light transmittance or above.

The definition of ‘uniformly toughened glass‘ is:
“Uniformly-toughened glass panes are more commonly known as tempered glass panes. This type of safety glazing is common in the automobile industry for such applications as side windows, rear windows and sunroofs. The glass is designed to shatter into small, dull pieces upon impact.”

Therefore, I think I’ll be OK.

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